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Freshers at Erasmus University had to obtain all sixty academic credits so far. Under political pressure, this could now come to an end. For some students, however, the obligation is considered as normal. “The BSA was one of the reasons why I chose EUR,” says Psychology student Anna Grunagel. “The pressure from the BSA gives me a lot of motivation.”

Economics student Idil Ozdemir agrees. “The BSA made me take my studies much more seriously, because the temptation was big in the first year. My classmates liked to socialise and just wanted to have fun with each other.”

Student Richard Pols had no trouble to achieve sixty credits in his first year, but he is not in favour of the BSA. “I know students who experience extra pressure because of the BSA. It creates unnecessary stress and makes studying no longer fun.” Communication student Willemijn van Wondelen also experienced the stress. “I had to take a resit, but even though it was indeed stressful, the BSA did motivate me to work harder.”

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